Thumbnail Image

Scribes' Slate

Tools For Transcribers and Translators

Software Linguistics in Application News Resources Useful Links

Current Projects

Phonetics
Phonology  
Morphology
Syntax
Hist Comparative

Linguistics in Application

Language is arbitrary, yet organized so the brain can systematically process it. This systematicization can be analyzed, helping us to understand more about 1) the communicative process 2) the brain's methodologies 3) historical information of a language and 4) unexplained "idiosyncracies" of a language. This information is valuable; it helps us understand the potential for software and its development process and provides depth of understanding in the language, an asset in transcription, translation, interpretation, and myriads of other applications.


This Section

In providing lessons in essential linguistics, we hope to help those new to applied linguistics find pride in their profession and enjoy the science of the topic. We hope you enjoy the lessons and find the research done exciting.

Phonetics

Phonetics is the analysis of sound in language. It's goal is to accurately investigate and catalog the library of human communicative segments and metadiscourse. An example would be the describing the difference between the American English lateral [l] with the velarized Russian equivalent [ly] (getting IPA right on this page is giving me trouble still, so don't take transcriptions too seriously yet).

Phonology

Phonology studies the interaction of sounds in language. Like phonetics, phonology wishes to understand the sound in language--the difference is that phonology tries to describe the patterns that these sounds and pieces of metadiscourse create.

Morphology

Morphology describes the interaction of meaningful parts in language.

Syntax

Syntax describes the interaction of words in a language.

Historical Comparative

Historical/Comparative Linguistics differs from other studies of language in that it is diachronic--an attempt to explain language over periods of time instead of at a "static" point. Comparative Linguistics uses a specific method to approximate the characteristics of a predecessor to a certain group of related languages. It therefore describes relations and systematic correspondences between languages. Historical linguistics can refer to many things, including the change of meaning and form of language over time. The two are often interdependent and therefore grouped together here.